/Imbuya Recipe

Imbuya Recipe

Using an African indigenous mightily nutrient dense green that it’s time to return to, and for many of us – sadly to be introduced to. I say sadly – because this has been a staple food for many South Africans and yet the divide between us has had it not feature in traditional retail. For those of you with fond and rich memories of mothers and grandmothers cooking this for you, thank you so much for sharing them with us, I used them to try it for the first time. For those of you new to it, you may not want to revere baby spinach as much as you have done before. This green is more relevant.

Known by many different names reflecting the variety of languages and cultures we are here – it is known as amaranth, moroggo, imfino, imbuya or tepe and it’s absurdly delicious and a great African green to include in your diet.

It is brought to us by Siphiwe from African Marmalade who is making it her life’s work to grow relevant African food and bring it closer to us.

So this is what I did with it and this is only the beginning. Next week we’ll be bringing you a great recipe for cassava leaves which Siphiwe blends up into a paste for us that yells – LARGE AMOUNTS OF CHLOROPHYLL HERE RIGHT NOW.

Ground nuts are another feature of African indigenous eating and cooking and seem to always feature with greens so it was a joy to use them. Ground nuts are not in the same family as ‘nuts’ – they are more a legume. My daughter has an immediate reaction to any form of nuts as does her Father and yet they had no reaction to these at all.

Imbuya Recipe
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Imbuya Recipe
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 5 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Heat the olive or coconut oil in a pot on the stove – keep heat low.
  2. Add the onions and garlic and let them gently sweat for 5 minutes until they are soft and starting to go translucent
  3. Throw in the tomatoes and cook for another 5 minutes, stirring all the time so that it doesn’t burn. Once the tomatoes are in, you can turn up the heat.
  4. Throw in the imbuya leaves, stir through once and then throw the ground nuts on top of that – don’t stir them through - then put the lid on your pot so that the leaves wild down into your onion mixture for 5 minutes.
  5. Start stirring it all through. There is little water in imbuya so once the greens are wilted down, you then add a ¼ cup of coconut cream and stir through.
  6. Serve
Recipe Notes

Notes: chilli would work well in this too, I can’t use it because my daughter hates it.

By |2017-12-07T14:52:05+00:00December 8th, 2016|Recipes, Vegetables|0 Comments

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