/Basic Bread Using Moffett’s Stone Milled Flour

Basic Bread Using Moffett’s Stone Milled Flour

Penny has given you this recipe for those of you wanting to use Moffett’s organic heritage wheat flour.

If you have any questions about using this flour, she’s great to talk to in-store, and if you don’t feel like making it, her sourdough loaves made with this flour are in-store right now together with whole-wheat sourdough bagels, mini loaves and her gluten free muffins.

The muffins are mad with brown rice flour, bulked with organic courgettes, sweetened with organic apricots (we change the fruit depending on what organic fruit we have in at the time) and raw honey. They are also dairy free as we use coconut milk in them.

Basic Bread Using Moffett's Stone Milled Flour
Print Recipe
You can use any recipe you want, but you might find you need to add liquid as this flour does take in more water than other flours. Below is a basic loaf of bread made using slow fermentation, this helps bring out the flavours and also breaks down anti-nutrients naturally part of grains.
Servings Prep Time
1 loaf 10 `minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30-40 minutes 3-4 hours total
Servings Prep Time
1 loaf 10 `minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30-40 minutes 3-4 hours total
Basic Bread Using Moffett's Stone Milled Flour
Print Recipe
You can use any recipe you want, but you might find you need to add liquid as this flour does take in more water than other flours. Below is a basic loaf of bread made using slow fermentation, this helps bring out the flavours and also breaks down anti-nutrients naturally part of grains.
Servings Prep Time
1 loaf 10 `minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30-40 minutes 3-4 hours total
Servings Prep Time
1 loaf 10 `minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30-40 minutes 3-4 hours total
Ingredients
Servings: loaf
Instructions
  1. Oil a loaf tin 22x11x7cm – and dust with flour.
  2. If possible, use a scale, it is more accurate than measuring cups.
Mixing the Dough
  1. Measure water into mixing bowl, water should be cool (water temperature depends on ambient temperature) about 20C. This will change in winter – when the weather is cold you want to slightly warm up your water, when the weather is hot you want to cool your water.
  2. Sprinkle the yeast onto the water and mix
  3. Add the flour and salt and mix to incorporate all the flour into the water. Make sure no dry flour remains. Scrape down the sides.
  4. Cover and let rest for 15-30 minutes.
Folding/turning the dough
  1. After 30 minutes, with wet hands fold the dough over itself : using both hands, take hold of the dough furthest from you pull it up and towards you making sure it doesn't tear and fold it over itself. Secure the edges.
  2. Now take hold of the opposite side and repeat the action. Do the same with other two sides of the dough.
  3. Cover and let rest for 15-30 minutes. Repeat the folding.
  4. After the last fold, cover the dough well and leave for 8-12 hours in a cool place to complete the fermentation.
  5. Lightly flour the surface of the work surface, and GENTLY empty the dough out onto the work surface. Lightly pat the dough flat and try to shape it gently into a straight edged rectangleits adge closest to you a bit shorter than the length of the pan.
  6. GENTLY roll the dough up away from you to create a log. Place the shaped dough into the well oiled tin with its seam down.
  7. Cover and let rise for about 2-3 hour.
Baking
  1. Heat the oven up to 230c. Place the oven rack about 1/3 up from the bottom of the oven. Before you load the loaf into the oven, brush the top with water and cut along the top with a knife.
  2. Bake for about 30-40 minutes. If the loaf browns too quickly, reduce the temperature to 200c towards the end of the baking.
  3. The loaf is ready when it has a hollow sound when tapping on its underside. Take out of the tin and cool completely before cutting .
By |2017-12-07T17:25:56+00:00Nov 17th, 2016|Recipes|0 Comments

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